Georgia LEARNS 2019

“Proof”

Georgia LEARNS 2019 will be a series of interactive segments for Executives across the spectrum of learning who are interested in collaborating to accelerate effective innovations. It will be held November 6th - 8th, 2019.

Our theme for 2019 "Proof" – builds on our progression since our first conference in 2011:

During this event we will continue to simultaneously experience, develop and expand relationship across the spectrum of learning.

Day 1 – Wednesday, November 6th will include an Open Forum regarding the “Academy for Advancing Learning Leadership” – a Collaborative Offering from Academy for Advancing Leadership and Georgia LEARNS Now in the morning and the Accountable Learning Organization Adaptable Framework Workshop in the afternoon.

Day 2- Thursday, November 7th will include eight sequential learning sessions from eight enterprise learning leaders. Each leader will facilitate a topic of their choice in a format of their choice. In addition there will be in-person discussions for up to 10 people being conducted in adjacent rooms on topics determined by the attendees.

The topic and format of the learning sessions may be changed at any time by the leader – including the day of the event. A formal presentation is not required (or expected.) We will have a laptop and projector ready – and are quite happy if they are not needed. The learning for the participants includes experiencing how a learning leader leverages this “freedom.”

To maximize the potential for a positive experience for all – including the learning leaders and the participants we have set up the online discussion groups (linked to the agenda below) that are available now, during the day of the event – and for an indefinite period following the event. Please use these discussions to assure your questions and insights are shared - independent of the topic or the format.

Time

Georgia Room

Dunwoody Room

Sandy Springs Room

8:30-9:20

Tom Spahr - Kirkpatrick

Open Conversation

Technology - Can We Keep Up (Paula Smith)

9:30-10:20

Greg Dillon - What "Proof" Means

Community Building (Michael Robertson)

Phd in ID – (Matt Meador)

10:30-11:20

Reverse BYOL - Governance

Lead With Your Brain (Rob Jenkins)

Course Careers (Troy Buckholdt)

11:30 – 12:50

David Gates - Transition Across Industries

Rabun County (Robert Pittman, Bob Fink)

Innovations in Video (Rich Beaudrie)

1:00 – 1:50

Leslie Joyce - Unintended Consequences

Private Investment (Sal Massaro)

AR/VR/AI (Shaunda Paden)

2:00 – 2:50

BYOL Plus - Proof

STE(A)M Truck (Daniel Ramirez)

Sales Training Innovations (Bruce Kopkin)

3:00 – 3:50

Takiyah Gross-Foote -The Future of Proof

Incentives (Michael Ruege)

Police Technology – (Randall Murphy)

4:00 – 4:50

Stephanie Crowe -Why We Don't Get ROI

Wearables (Bill Crose)

Lutzie43 (Bill Butler and Eric Knapp)

Day 3 – Friday, November 8th will be 4 simultaneous open collaboration sessions (determined by attendees on November 7th.)

Georgia LEARNS 2019 Agenda

Each segment is linked to an online discussion forum.

Please participate in the discussions - before, during and after Georgia LEARNS 2019

Day 1 – November 6th

Sandy Springs Innovation Center

1000 Abernathy Road

400 Building, Suite L-10

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

 

8:00 to 8:30 Informal Conversation and Coffee

8:30 to Noon                 Segment 1(19) – Academy for Advancing Learning Leadership – Open Forum

Noon to 1:00 PM           Lunch Break

1:00 to 5:00 PM            Segment 2(19) – Accountable Learning Organization Adaptable Framework Workshop

Day 2 – November 7th

Northpark 400 Conference Center

1000 Abernathy Road

400 Building, Third Floor

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

 

8:00 to 8:30 Informal conversation and Breakfast

   8:30 to 9:20    Segment 3(19) – Kirkpatrick - Thomas Spahr - Vice President of Talent Management and Development at The Home Depot

                          Open Conversation

                         Technology - Can We Keep Up (Paula Smith)

   9:30 to 10:20  Segment 4(19) – What "Proof" Means - Greg Dillon -Senior Manager, National Employee Development at Randstad USA

                        Community Building (Michael Robertson)

                        Phd in ID – (Matt Meador)

  10:30 to 11:20   Segment 5(19) – Governance - Reverse BYOL

                        Lead With Your Brain (Rob Jenkins)

                        Course Careers (Troy Buckholdt)

  11:30 to 1:00  Segment 6(19) – Learning Leaders Career Transition Across Industries - David Gates MA Global Learning & Development at Fiserv

                        Rabun County (Robert Pittman, Bob Fink)

                        Innovations in Video (Rich Beaudrie)

  1:00 to 1:50   Segment 7(19) – "Unintended Consequences" - Leslie Joyce - EVP and Chief People Officer, Exide Technologies (Former)

                       Private Investment (Sal Massaro)

                       AR/VR/AI (Shaunda Paden)

  2:00 to 2:50   Segment 8(19) – BYOL Plus - Proof

                       STE(A)M Truck (Daniel Ramirez)

                       Sales Training Innovations (Bruce Kopkin)

  3:00 to 3:50   Segment 9(19) – The Future of Proof - Takiyah Gross-Foote Vice President Talent Development at LexisNexis Risk Solutions & Reed Business Information

                       Incentives (Michael Ruege)

                       Police Technology – (Randall Murphy)

  4:00 to 4:50   Segment 10(19) – "Why We Don't Get ROI" - Stephanie Crowe - Vice President Human Resources at Ingenico Inc.

                    Wearables (Bill Crose)

                           Lutzie43 (Bill Butler and Eric Knapp)

  

Day 3 – November 8th

Sandy Springs Innovation Center

1000 Abernathy Road

400 Building, Suite L-10

Sandy Springs, GA 30328

 

   8:00 to 12:00      Segment 11(19) – Collaboration Working Sessions

Please contact Paul Terlemezian pault@ifivealliances.com 404-252-8330 with any questions.

Planning for Georgia LEARNS 2020 is in progress - please offer your interests, insights and comments.

Comment by Bill Crose on July 28, 2019 at 9:40pm

The top line of the KT Model is the decision to be made, then "must haves", nice to haves, weightings, scoring, & probability/seriousness. The premise of continuous improvement is that you're always asking how performance, process, organizations, work environments, etc. can be improved. An IoT system like Pythia, constantly provides lists of things to improve and even suggests where the best improvement opportunities exist those that will provide the greatest return on investment. It works like this: 

When using Pythia, workers optionally provide feedback at the end of every successfully completed process. A Feedback Report organizes all the feedback of which continuous performance & process feedback is included. Those suggestions create a single list of possible improvement opportunities that could become the top line of the model; the decision to make. Should we change the X step as suggested in the Feedback Report? Should we purchase a new tool? Get your people to analyze the suggestion(s) using the KT Method & recommend a decision. There will be LOTS of these to work through at first, then people will become more selective about what they suggest.

Pythia also captures how long it takes users to complete each process step. That data can be accumulated to report how long it takes users to perform entire processes or every, individual step. Either way, the data is sorted, compiled, then reported in ways that reveal a variety of improvement opportunities. Sort by Location to find local issues. Sort by process step to find process improvement opportunities. Sort by date range to find date related events (training program issues, equipment failures, etc.)  Upon sorting a target process or process step, the Pythia system automatically calculates mean performance durations based sort variables (entire organization, department, select locations, or individuals, individual experience range, and from/to performance date ranges.) Results are color-coded, displayed, and optionally printed according to proximity of mean. Performance results closest to mean are colored green, farthest from mean are red, and we've set the system to color 10% of what amounts to Pareto's 20, gold. Best practices are found in the Gold range along with improvement opportunities with the best chances of providing the greatest ROI. (Choosing to improve processes/steps in the green range will be easy & cheap to fix but won't return much. Items in the red would return a lot but at high cost. Gold items are in the middle.)  Gold items lead to top line (decisions) in the KT Model. Put a team of workers on deciding which gold items to fix or use to improve the process, step, organization, department, location, individual...  I attached a sample report to show how Pythia IoT sorts data. The example is a system test for a single, process step that happens to be a health code audit point, so it must be performed well. 

Pythia also uses IoT to trigger supervisor alerts when workers don't spend the minimum expected amount of time performing critical process steps. These alerts are delivered as emails and are ultimately just blips or trends. Trends are analyzed & decision processes launched. 

So, the (Pythia) IoT system tells you where to look to improve performance, processes, etc. and creates 3 paths to KT Decisionmaking Model; User Feedback, Alerts, and Mean Performance Durations. The people making improvement suggestions and discovering better ways to do things should be led & supported by management to make decisions & ultimately to champion & implement the changes.

Comment by Bill Crose on July 28, 2019 at 9:52pm

One more IoT comment. LOL! This one regarding proof. 

When you capture performance data at process step granularity and can sort it by date, you can then sort performance before an intervention (process, management, equipment...change, training, marketing, HR program...) to learn how long it took to perform the process or step across the entire organization/department/location/etc. and easily calculate the average cost per performance event in dollars/financial terms. Do the same thing after the intervention, subtract the smaller number from the larger and you'll have proof of success or failure. 

Comment by Hal Schlenger on July 28, 2019 at 11:21pm

Paul, you asked  "Who does the analysis? Who does the adjustment?"  To me, it is basic:  leadership.  Whoever are the stakeholders should have input to the analysis; leadership leads by making adjustments (ie decisions).  The key is that it is ongoing.  

Bonus:  How would this work for those at the bottom?  Communication is designed to explain and ideally, invite feedback so that there is undersstanding and ultimately alignment.  This goes back to Philip Crosby and Edwards Deming's quality management.

Cheers, Hal

Comment by Hal Schlenger on July 28, 2019 at 11:21pm

Paul, you asked  "Who does the analysis? Who does the adjustment?"  To me, it is basic:  leadership.  Whoever are the stakeholders should have input to the analysis; leadership leads by making adjustments (ie decisions).  The key is that it is ongoing.  

Bonus:  How would this work for those at the bottom?  Communication is designed to explain and ideally, invite feedback so that there is understanding and ultimately alignment.  This goes back to Philip Crosby and Edwards Deming's quality management.

Cheers, Hal

Comment by Hal Schlenger on July 28, 2019 at 11:21pm

Paul, you asked  "Who does the analysis? Who does the adjustment?"  To me, it is basic:  leadership.  Whoever are the stakeholders should have input to the analysis; leadership leads by making adjustments (ie decisions).  The key is that it is ongoing.  

Bonus:  How would this work for those at the bottom?  Communication is designed to explain and ideally, invite feedback so that there is understanding and ultimately alignment.  This goes back to Philip Crosby and Edwards Deming's quality management.

Cheers, Hal

Comment by Paul Terlemezian on August 21, 2019 at 9:34am
  1. Do we know what factors lead to an individual failing to perform to the expected level after they have completed training?
  2. Do we have theories or proof?
  3. Do we need proof?
  4. How would we get proof and what would we do if we had it?
Comment by Bill Crose on November 4, 2019 at 4:08pm

I'm looking forward to this event, meeting some new people, reconnecting with others, and just getting back to Atlanta again this week.

Because I greatly prefer relaxing with interesting professionals than sitting alone in a hotel room, please consider joining me at one of my favorite Atlanta spots on Wednesday evening; The Red Phone Booth. Come for dinner or just drinks, you won't be disappointed either way. The entertainment is behind the bar as the bartenders give a top-notch, never ending lesson in service and quality. Feel free to ask them how they learned all those recipes in their menu and if they could have learned faster/better by using your technology; I did! Men, wear a collared shirt (it's required) and preferably a jacket (but jacket is not required). Women, wear something closer to business than casual. Contact me if you plan to go and I'll give you the code; the RPB requires a secret code to enter.  

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60898-d10680141-Revi...  

Let me know if Thursday night works better. 

Bill

bcrose1@adytonusa.com

248.808.0111

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